Rel Canonical How And Why To Use

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Rel Canonical   •   Oct 16, 2012

Rel Canonical How And Why To Use

Duplicate content can hurt a website’s ranking with all of the major search engines. When Google and the other big engines see several identical pages, they assume that those extras are a weakness, and the website loses a significant amount of clout as a result.

Duplicate content can also drain your link juice. If you’ve got three or four identical pages showing up during the same search, those pages will generally rank collectively lower than a single, canonical source.

The rel=”canonical” attribute tells the search engine to consider a link to be the main version of a page. While engines like Google try to automatically figure out which version of a page is most authoritative–the search engine will discount &sort=price, &sort=title and other common URL tags in favor of a page without said tags–the rel=”canonical” attribute takes the guesswork out of the equation.

The proper way to use the rel=”canonical” element is alongside a link element in the section of each duplicate page on your website. This includes pages that are simply sorted versions of other pages and other common copies.

Canonical absolute links are also useful for fighting scrapers who try to steal your content. By pointing all of your reference links back to the canonical version of your page, you’ll prevent scrapers from diminishing your website’s ranking. While a disreputable website could remove your Rel Canonical attribute, most won’t take the time to do so. Some scrapers are wholly unaware of the purpose of this page element while others are simply lazy; in either case, your website benefits from the attribute placement.

  • Drain Off Link Juice

  • Can Hurt A Websites Ranking

  • Avoids Getting Dinged for Duplicate Content

The Rel Canonical attribute tells the search engine to consider a link to be the main version of a page. While engines like Google try to automatically figure out which version of a page is most authoritative–the search engine will discount &sort=price, &sort=title and other common URL tags in favor of a page without said tags–the Rel Canonical attribute takes the guesswork out of the equation.

By | 2017-04-15T00:52:49+00:00 October 16th, 2012|Optimizing, SEO, Website Development|